Get exclusive deal
Hey there gaming fan!

$50 coupon on your next game!




11 Best AR Smart Glasses (Augmented Reality Headsets)!

11 Best AR Headsets!!
Microsoft HoloLens vs Sony SmartEyeglass vs Epson Moverio BT-300 vs Google Glass vs Vuzix M300 Smart Glasses vs Meta 2 vs Recon Jet vs Optivent Ora-1 vs GlassUp vs Laster SeeThru vs Atheer One

For Latest Gadgets News:-

Link to all the products in this video :-

Microsoft HoloLens :-
Sony SmartEyeglass :-
Epson Moverio BT-300 :-
Google Glass :-
Vuzix M300 Smart Glasses :-
Meta 2 :-
Recon Jet :-
Optivent Ora-1 :-
GlassUp :-
Laster SeeThru :-
Atheer One :-

✔ Enjoying my content? well then don't forget to:

★ Subscribe
★ Like
★ Comment
★ Favorite
★ Share with your friends
➤ Social Media:

★ Follow me on Twitter »
★ Like me on Facebook »
★ Subscribe to my channel »
★ Visit our official website »
Techno Source does not endorse any of these products.

Microsoft HoloLens
What it is: On paper, we love Microsoft's hologram-themed augmented reality glasses—the true augmented reality concept that will, ideally, have wearers waving their arms around to interact with screens and full-color virtual objects wherever they are. Early demos show neophytes fixing light switches with the help of virtual assistants, dialed in via Microsoft's Skype, who draw diagrams and arrows within the picture the HoloLens-wearing person is seeing. If you want to dial up the coolness factor a bit, you can also take an augmented-reality-driven trip through Mars, seeing what a rover might see, projected entirely on the floor of your home or apartment.

Sony SmartEyeglass
What it is: ony's SmartEyeglass wearable comes with some decently thick rims, and serves as a heads-up display for your Android device. You get information such as directions, Tweets related to your location and real-time voice translations via green text that appears over the lenses.

Epson Moverio BT-200
What it is: Epson is targeting a more immersive experience with its Moverio Smart Glasses, with two screens that cast a 960 x 540-pixel image over each of your eyes. You won't win the "best-dressed" award among your friends with these clunky frames, nor will you even be able to really pair these glasses with your smartphone. Instead, you'll interact with the Moverio BT-200 via a special cable-connected control box that comes with a large touch panel.

Google Glass
What it is: If there's one augmented reality headset you've likely heard of, it's Google Glass.
With this tiny head-mounted display, you can see a number of superimposed information screens over your daily life: the weather, current events, missed calls, even turn-based navigation based on your smartphone's GPS. Glass works with a variety of Android-friendly third-party apps as well. And, yes, you can even tell the headset to take pictures of what you were looking at. Glass' battery lasts about a day for normal use; much less if you're snapping pictures and shooting videos with your eyewear.

Vuzix M100 Smart Glasses
What it is: One of Google Glass' more well-known competitors is finally available for consumers. There's not much difference between the "prosumer" model and the glasses' typical enterprise/industrial version, save for the fact that the device is actually attached to a pair of glasses instead of what otherwise looks like safety goggles.

Meta 2
What it is: If Tony Stark wore smart glasses, he'd likely opt for the Meta 2. These are not the ones you'll wear outside while getting walking directions; these are the ones you'll wear if you are literally trying to recreate Minority Report. You'll be able to do things such as surf the Web by shifting your hands left and right in front of you, or drag windows by literally clenching them with a fist and moving them around your field of view.

Recon Jet
What it is: This augmented reality device is like a sportier version of Google Glass. It uses a similar "screen in front of part of your eye" setup, with a slightly more bulging apparatus housing the glasses' HD camera, touchpad and sensors. The device's camera and high-resolution display are mounted to polarized glasses — the perfect thing to have when you're running or biking in the afternoon sun — and you can pair your glasses to either iOS or Android devices to see calls and messages on-the-fly. You can also use sports-themed apps that track metrics such as speed, pace, dist